Welcome to RIT's 175th Anniversary website. The University celebrated the anniversary during the 2004-05 academic year. This website is no longer active and will no longer be updated. The site remains active, however, to preserve the history of both RIT and the anniversary year.

 
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College of Computing & Information Sciences Timeline
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  1964 The Computer Center, Fred Henderson, Director, reported that a new disk storage drive and related equipment is now fully installed and in operation. This adds two million digits of random access storage to our 1620 system.
 
  1964 The Computer Center announces that as in the past, it is necessary to sign up in advance for time on the computer and other equipment. During regular hours (8 AM to 5 PM Monday-Friday) time is available on a first-come first-serve basis for both faculty and staff.
 
  1964 The Computer Center states, our present equipment will handle a maximum of 100 questions on four IBM mark-sense cards. With some modifications to the mark-sense equipment we could handle 150 questions on only three cards.
 
  1966 Frederick C. Burgwardt, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, proposed that RIT join the approximately 20 other institutions in the nation and implement a program in Computer Technology.
 
  1967 Business Week reports that for IBM alone, computer installations (IBM 1620 and IBM 360 batch-processing) increased by 50% and that total systems in the U.S. now number approximately 40,000 and a conservative estimate of 70,000 installations by 1970.
 
  1967 Recommendation is made that the Department of Computer Technology would most logically fit in the Institute College since improvement of computers and computer systems is largely a result of applying new techniques as they are developed.
 
  1967 Under the program in Computer Technology proposal, the first class of students in Computer Technology would be accepted as second year students consisting primarily of in-school transfers. Forty-five students were projected to enroll. The estimated program cost was $72,800, consisting of $25,000 for staff, $33,800 for lab equipment, $1,000 for office furniture, $8,000 for lab furniture, and $5,000 for supplies.
 
  1969 the Institute announces that they have engaged the services of Information Associates, Inc. to assist in the development of a computer assisted admissions system.
 
  1969 RITs Center for Educational & Institutional Research reported on the needs of computers. The primary use of computers will be for conventional statistical analyses and for information retrieval as it applies to research. Very little use has been made of the computer in the past and only for statistical analyses. As the Center grows, considerably more use of the computer is anticipated. Need for typewriter-printer is anticipated. The availability of a plotter to convert digital information to graphical information is desired.
 
  1970 Dr. John L. Gunter, 33, is appointed as Director of Computer Services with the rank of Associate Professor. Gunter has his Ph.D. in theoretical and solid state physics from BYU. Primary duty is to establish a centralized Institute-wide computer facility and, secondly, to serve on a planning committee to study the feasibility of a School of Computer Science and Technologies.
 
  1970 Edward S. Todd, VP Instructional Development and Planning, determines, “the time seems ripe to bring computing education at RIT to fruition” and presents a charge to an Institute-wide Computer Education Committee (CEC).
 
  1970 A joint seminar titled, “Basic Computing Principles,” is presented by the Controller and Computer Sciences.
 
  1970 Evelyn Rozanski joins RIT’s Computing program as an Instructor.
 
  1970 A joint seminar titled, “Management Information Systems,” is presented by the Controller and Computer Sciences.
 
  1971 President Paul Miller places a mandatory hold on computer systems and new programming requests, changes or additions and decides to upgrade the computing capabilities by installing a Xerox Data System Sigma 6 Computer system. This is a major conversion from the existing IBM-type programs to XDS-type programs.
 
  1971 School of Computer Science & Technology program created; undergrad catalog – Watson Walker, Head
Electrical Engineering Department had courses in digital computer systems and digital computer workshop – analog/hybrid communication.
 
  1972 RIT began one of the first undergraduate schools of computer science and technology, called Computer Systems, in the nation.
 
  1972 RIT announces a new Bachelor of Technology (B.T.) degree program in Computer Systems.
 
  1972-1973

School of Applied Science – Jim Forman, Director

  • Computer techniques in civil technology.
  • Center for Community College Faculty Development, Richard Rinehart, Director; computer systems were part of it with the Department of Computer Science & Technology.
  • Courses included Intro to Computer Science, Intro to the Digital Computer, Programming Language.
 
  1973-1974 Computer Systems Department, John L. Gunther, Acting Chair
 
  1974 New program announcement in a Master of Science degree in Computer System Management, Dr. Richard Cheng, Chairman. Tuition for each graduate credit hour is $87.00; for students taking 12-18 credit hours the tuition is $1,024.00. A minimum of 44-quarter hours of course work plus four-quarter hours of thesis research is required. The thesis research may be replaced by additional course work, followed by a comprehensive examination.
 
  1974-1975

Institute College created

  • It incorporates the School of Applied Science, Department of Computer Science & Technology, Department of Packaging Science and Center for Community/Jr. College Relations.
  • Bill Stratton on staff as instructor in Computer Science & Technology.
 
  1975-1976 Institute College – same as above; Wiley McKinzie, lecturer
Courses: Intro to Computers, Computer Techniques, Program Language–FORTRAN, COBOL, computer systems software.
 
  1975-1976

Undergraduate Programs “Official Bulletin”

  • Institute College, Roy I. Satre, Dean
  • Computer Science: Richard T. Cheng, Chair; faculty – Rodger Baker, Mike Atkins, Evelyn Rozanski, Bill Stratton

 
  1977-1978 Undergrad Programs “Official Bulletin”
Programs: Applied Software Science, Computer Science, Computer Systems, Systems Software Science, Computer Engineering, Packaging Science, Civil Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, and Audiovisual Communications§ Evelyn Rozanski, Assoc. Professor; Mike Lutz, Ass’t. Professor; Hank Etlinger, Instructor; Ken Reek, Lecturer.
 
  1978-1979

Undergraduate Programs “Official Bulletin”

  • Institute College
  • Programs same as previous year
 
  1979 The School of Computer Science & Technology hosts its open house and tour of its new facilities in the Ross Memorial Building.
 
  1980

Institute College – Dennis Nystrom, Dean

  • Applied Software Science became an “option” within Computer Science
  • Computer Technology is a program with Software Systems an option within it
 
  1980 Jack Hollingsworth is Director of School of Computer Science & Technology; Mike Lutz is the Coordinator of the Systems Software Science option
 
  1980 Jack Hollingsworth named Director of RITs School of Computer Science & Technology. He came to RIT in 1979 after 22 years at RPI where he started RPI’s computer science program.
 
  1981 Institute College becomes the College of Applied Science & Technology; Dennis Nystrom, Dean
Programs: Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Packaging Science, Civil Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, Manufacturing Engineering Technology, Energy Technology, and Audiovisual Communications
 
  1981-1982

Graduate Study

  • Master of Science in Computer Science offered (Peter Anderson, Coordinator)
  • Master of Science in Information Science offered (Peter Anderson, Acting Coordinator)
 
  1982-1983 College of Applied Science & Technology; Dennis Nystrom, Dean
Programs differences: Computer Technology with Computer Systems option & System Software option Computer Engineering
 
  1982-1983

Graduate Degrees

  • Wiley McKinzie, Director, School of Computer Science & Technology
  • Peter Anderson, Chairman of Graduate Studies
  • Three graduate programs offered:
    • Masters in Computer Science
    • Masters in Computer Systems Management
    • Masters in Information Science
 
  1982 Michael Charles, Assistant VP of Information Systems and Computing (ISC) – announces that the campus computer facilities will expand and the Ross building will house a micro computing lab, professional computing lab, and faculty computer development lab. The micro-computing lab will be used for student computer literacy classes; the professional computing lab will be used by computer science students; and the development lab will be used by faculty to improve micro, mini and large-scale computing skills.
 
  1983-1984 Faculty
Computer Science & Technology: Evelyn Rozanski, Jeff Lasky, Mike Lutz, Peter Lutz, Peter Anderson, Al Biles, Warren Carithers, Hank Etlinger, Jim Heliotis, and Guy Johnson
 
  1983-1984

Faculty

  • Rayno Niemi; Dean Dennis Nystrom, Wiley McKinzie, Director, School of Computer Science & Technology
  • Food Service Administration & Dietetics added & Department of Instructional Technology, Clint Wallington, Director
 
  mid-1980s VAX computer system, bldg 10
 
  1984 The primary mission of RITs School of Computer Science and Technology, CAST, is to educate students to become software development professionals. Software development is the central theme of computer science.
 
  1984-1985

Dennis Nystrom, Dean

  • Food, Hotel & Tourism Management added
  • The Department of Instructional Technology, School of Engineering Technology, School of Computer Science & Technology (Wiley McKinzie, Director), Department of Packaging Science, School of Food, Hotel & Tourism Management.
 
  1986-1987 RITs annual tuition is $7,701; with room, board and fees the grand total is $12,659.
 
  1987 RIT establishes a new masters degree program in Computer Software Development and Management.
 
  1987-1988

Graduate Study, School of Computer Science & Technology

  • Wiley McKinzie, Director
  • Peter Anderson, Chairman, Graduate Computer Science Department
  • Guy Johnson, Chairman, Department of Applied Computer Studies
    offered:
    • Master of Science in Computer Science
    • Master of Science in Software Development & Management
    • Advanced Certificate in Applied Computer Studies
 
  1988-1989

College of Applied Science & Technology – Wiley McKinzie, Dean

  • All computer systems run in the Unix environment and are connected with Ethernet
  • Evelyn Rozanski, Acting Director of Computer Science (School of)
  • Peter Anderson, Chair; Graduate Computer Science
  • Guy Johnson, Chair; Department of Applied Computer Studies
 
  1988 Department of Computer Science received its accreditation.
 
  1989-1990

Wiley McKinzie, Dean

  • Bill Stratton, Director; School of Computer Science & Information Technology
  • Evelyn Rozanski, Chair; Undergraduate Computer Science
  • Peter Anderson, Chair; Graduate Computer Science
 
  1990-1991

Wiley McKinzie, Dean

  • School of Computer Science & Information Technology
  • Bill Stratton, Director
  • Al Biles, Chair; Department of Computer Science
  • Guy Johnson, Chair; Department of Information Technology
 
  1991 Computer Lab, bldg 10
 
  1991-1992

Wiley McKinzie, Dean

  • Al Biles, Chair; Department of Computer Science
  • Peter Lutz, Chair; Department of Information Technology
 
  1993 RIT launched the development of what would eventually become the first undergraduate program on software engineering in the United States.
 
  1993-1994
  • Al Biles developing jazz improvisation software that will enable a computer to compose; he believes the project will lead to greater understanding of computer and artificial intelligence.
  • Walter Wolf, Chair; Computer Science
  • Pete Lutz, Chair; Information Technology
  • Bill Stratton, Director; School of Computer Science & Technology
 
  1994 Department of Computer Science renewed its accreditation.

 
  1995-1996
  • Bill Stratton, Director; School of Computer Science & Technology
  • Walter Wolf, Chair; Computer Science
  • Eydie Lawson, Chair, Information Technology
 
  1996 RIT accepted its first freshmen class of software engineering majors.
 
  1997-1998

Wiley McKinzie, Dean

  • Mike Lutz, Software Engineering; Coord.
  • Eydie Lawson, Information Technology
  • Walter Wolf, Chair; Computer Science
 
  1997 Information Technology Department was honored to exhibit the CAROL project, an outgrowth of curriculum taught by Gordon Goodman and Stephen Jacobs that used students to build web sites for Art Museums and other non-Profits, at the Association for Computing Machinery’s 50th anniversary conference.
 
  1998 Three RIT computer science majors placed second in the Regional ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest. Established in 1970, it’s the oldest and largest programming competition for the world’s universities. Each year more then 4,000 students from around the globe participate.
 
  1998-2000

Wiley McKinzie, Dean

  • Walter Wolf, Chair, Computer Science
  • Mike Lutz, Chair; Software Engineering
  • Eydie Lawson, Chair; Information Technology
 
  2000 Final Proposal on the College of Computing. The College of Computing will immerge from the College of Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and will begin educating 3,000 students that are currently enrolled in the CAST departments of computer science, information technology, and software engineering. Additionally, the new College of Computing will include an IT Lab.
 
  2000 Department of Computer Science renewed its accreditation.
 
  2000-2001

Wiley McKinzie, Dean, CAST

  • Walter Wolf, Interim Dean, GCCIS
  • Software Engineering, J. Fernando Naveda, Chair
  • Information Technology, Edith Lawson, Chair
  • Computer Science, Margaret Reek, Acting Chair
  • Computer Science has combine BS/MS program
 
  2001 RIT graduated the first (12) software engineers in the United States.
 
  2001 Rochester Institute of Technology, renowned for its cutting-edge technology education, announces a major addition: the creation of a first-of-its-kind college in the United States—a college that incorporates computing and the Internet revolution with information sciences. The B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences will comprehensively address the computing and information technologies of today, and into the future. Named for its founding donor, B. Thomas Golisano, chairman and chief executive officer of Paychex Inc., the college owes its launch to his gift of $14 million. The gift is the largest gift in RIT history from an individual and is believed to be the largest given to any university or college in the Rochester area.


During a celebratory announcement of RIT's new College of Computing and Information Sciences, RIT unveiled a banner displaying the college's name honoring B. Thomas Golisano, chairman and CEO of Paychex Inc.

 
  2001 At a groundbreaking, RIT President Simone; Frontier CEO Martin Mucci; Sen. Jim Alesi; Don Boyd, IT Collaboratory director; Walter Wolf, acting dean, B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences; and Jeffrey Lasky, head of the IT Lab, break ground for the new cutting-edge facility designed for research and development. Alesi was instrumental in securing the $1.5 million funding for the IT Lab.
 
  2001 Daisuke Asano, recently became the first student to graduate from RIT after completing studies here through a partnership with Kyoto Computer Gakuin in Japan. After finishing undergraduate coursework in Japan, including RIT-produced and other courses, Asano studied at RIT for 1 1/2 years and earned a master's degree in information technology.
 
  2001

Breaking ground on October 12th for the new complex that will be home to the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences are, from left, Walter Wolf, interim dean; Stanley McKenzie, provost; William Buckingham, chairman of the RIT Board of Trustees; Tom Golisano, CEO of Paychex Inc.; Albert Simone, RIT president; Joan Thomas, information technology academic advisor; Jim Vallino, assistant professor of computer science and software engineering; and Bryan Reich, Information Technology graduate student.

With Tom Golisano at a "kick-off" celebration for the new college on October 12th are, from left, Joanne Catan, Theresa Pozzi and Sandy Ferrara, support staff in the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

 
  2002 Helping meet demand and tapping student interest, Rochester Institute of Technology created a master’s concentration in game programming, one of the first of its kind anywhere, offered by RIT’s information technology department in the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences. Three courses comprise the just-approved concentration: 2-D Graphics Programming, Introduction to 3-D and 3-D Graphics Programming. Currently, 28 students from each program in the computing college—computer science, information technology and software engineering—are signed up.
 
  2002 Provost Stan McKenzie announces the appointment of Dr. Jorge L. Diaz-Herrera as the new dean of the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, beginning July 24, 2002. Dr. Diaz-Herrera will join RIT having served for two years as the Department Head for the Department of Computer Science as Southern Polytechnic State University (SPSU) in Georgia
 
  2002 Jorge Díaz-Herrera has been named the first dean of the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences
 
  2002 RIT and invited dignitaries officially opened the Lab for Applied Computing (formerly known as the IT Lab), a cutting edge facility in IT research and development for upstate New York. The Lab for Applied Computing (LAC) is the result of Sen. Jim Alesi’s efforts; working with Senate Majority Leader Joe Bruno, in securing $1.5 million in New York state funds to build the facility. The Lab will play a key part in developing regional strength in IT jobs and businesses, and an important step for RIT’s Information Technology Collaboratory–a STAR Center funded last year by $14 million from the state.
 
  2002 Rochester Institute of Technology has named its first dean of the new B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences. Jorge Díaz-Herrera replaced Walter Wolf, who served as interim dean since creation of the college in February 2001. Díaz-Herrera was also named professor of computer science. Díaz-Herrera comes to RIT from Southern Polytechnic State University in Marietta, Georgia, where he was professor and department head of computer science, one of the university’s largest departments with over 1,000 undergraduate and graduate students. He was also program coordinator of the university’s Yamacraw project, an economic development initiative to establish Georgia as a world leader in the design of broadband infrastructure systems, devices and chips.
 
  2002-2003 Jorge L Diaz-Herrera, Dean
  • Computer Science – Walter Wolf, Chair
  • Software Engineering – J. Fernando Naveda, Chair
  • Information Technology – Edith Lawson, Chair


IT has new media option

 
  2002 RIT’s Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences has introduced a BS degree in applied networking and system administration. The college recently received state approval for the new program. Applied networking and system administration focuses on the design, construction and operation of computer networks using available components, along with managing the servers that keep users interconnected. Previously, these areas were handled as part of a broader curriculum within the Department of Information Technology.
 
  2003 RIT became one of the first universities to have an ABET – accredited degree in software engineering in the U.S.
 
  2003 Operations at RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences—one of the nations leading providers of computer-related studies—are being transferred into a brand new building on campus. GCCIS faculty and staff are setting up shop in the new "wireless" facility. It begins the process of consolidating most of the college’s activities—formerly conducted in a half dozen buildings across campus—under one roof. The transition comes only 15 months after RIT officials broke ground on the three-story, 177,000-square-foot building. Classes in the new building will begin in March with the start of spring quarter.
 
  2003 Dean Jorge Díaz-Herrera announced Dr. Roger Gaborski has been named associate dean for graduate studies and research in the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences (GCCIS), and director of the Laboratory for Applied Computing (LAC)
 
  2003 Rochester Institute of Technology formally dedicated the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, acknowledging its status as the largest comprehensive computing college in the nation. Albert Simone, RIT president, and B. Thomas Golisano, chairman and CEO of Paychex Inc. and new owner of the National Hockey League’s Buffalo Sabres, attended the ceremony inside the college’s recently constructed facility. A $14 million gift from Golisano, offered in 2001, is responsible for creating the college. It remains the single largest gift to any Rochester-area college or university by a living donor.
 
  2003 Edith Lawson appointed associate dean of the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences—one of the largest comprehensive computing colleges in the nation. Lawson previously served as chair of RIT’s information technology department for eight years. During that time, the undergraduate program grew from 234 students to around 1,200. The graduate program, which started in 1995, has expanded to 500 students.
 
  2003 RIT at the SIGGRAPH Exposition, San Diego, CA. GCCIS and CIAS joined forces at the trade show that enables attendees to promote their innovations nationally and internationally. The tradeshow showcased animation, haptics, advanced rendering, augmented reality, web-based visualization, human-machine systems, and much more. GCCIS was represented by Walter Wolf, Kim Hinckley, Andy Phelps, Nan Schaller, Pamela Cartwright, and Cheryl McLean (coordinator).
 
  2003-2004

Jorge L. Diaz-Herrera, Dean

  • Computer Science – Walter Wolf, Chair
  • Software Engineering – J. Fernando. Naveda, Chair
  • Information Technology – Jim Leone, Chair
 
  2003 Computer lab in building 70, the new B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences
 
  2003 RIT hosted the Regional Finals of 2003 ACM Northeast North America Programming Contest an event in which RIT placed second in 1998.
 
  2003 Rochester Institute of Technology is preparing a new master’s degree program in computing security and information assurance. The program, to be offered through RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences (GCCIS), consists of a half dozen core courses dealing with technical, business, ethical and administrative aspects of security. The computing security master’s degree program is expecting to begin next fall. Initially, about 25 students per year will be accepted, but the program will likely grow to a maximum of 50 students annually.
     
 
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